So Much to Do, So Little Time -- Court Approved "Overwork" Theory in Alberts v. Aurora Behavioral Health Care

Obtaining class certification in wage and hour cases typically requires a showing that the employer has engaged in a systemic policy that violates the law.  Maintaining scheduled hours, expecting employees to meet minimum production requirements, and requiring advance approval to work overtime are not illegal practices.  In combination, however, these policies can result in an environment that systemically pressures employees to work unreported hours beyond their scheduled shifts and to skip breaks in order to complete their assigned tasks in the time allotted.   

For example, in Alberts v. Aurora Behavioral Health Care, 241 Cal.App.4th 388 (2015), the Second District Court of Appeal held that the lower court had erred in refusing to certify a class of registered nurses based on the following allegations:

Hospital policy requires overtime be approved in advance, and failure to seek approval for overtime may subject an employee to discipline. Plaintiffs assert that the Hospital actively discouraged nursing staff from requesting overtime by criticizing and threatening to discipline employees who worked too much overtime, criticizing and intimidating employees who requested overtime and repeatedly denying legitimate overtime requests. At the same time, employees—especially RN’s, who were required to complete charts and other mandatory paperwork—were placed under pressure to ensure that all their work was completed each shift. . . .  As a result, employees were routinely forced to clock out after their shifts, then return to work to complete paperwork.

The lower court had articulated a number of rationales for rejecting certification based on such evidence, including its view that there would be no liability if the decision to work off-the-clock was a personal choice made by individual workers.  The appellate court rejected this reasoning, noting that:

[E]ven if we assume there is evidence some members of the nursing staff voluntarily worked uncompensated overtime, such a "choice" is impermissible under California law. A nonexempt employee (such as the putative class members here) may not lawfully volunteer to work off-the-clock without compensation.

Alberts v. Aurora thus reinforces several important lessons.  Employers need to be aware that their policies need not be illegal on their face to trigger class-wide liability -- it may be sufficient that their cumulative effect communicates an implied expectation for employees to under-report their work time.    Employees on the other hand should recognize that they are still entitled to additional compensation even if they "voluntarily" agreed to work off-the-clock.

 

 

 

 

 

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